EDUCATION

Click on a topic below for more info.

Flower

What is the difference between cannabis types?
When you shop, you may notice strains are commonly broken up into three distinct groups: indica, sativa, and hybrid.

Most consumers have used these three cannabis types as a touchstone for predicting effects:

  • Indica strains are believed to be physically sedating, perfect for relaxing with a movie or as a nightcap before bed.
  • Sativa stains tend to provide more invigorating, uplifting cerebral effects that pair well with physical activity, social gatherings, and creative projects.
  • Hybrids are thought to fall somewhere in between the indica-sativa spectrum, depending on the traits they inherit from their parent strains.

Concentrates

Concentrates are safe, yet potent. Concentrates are products made from the cannabis plant that have been processed to keep only the most desirable plant compounds (primarily the cannabinoids and terpenes), while removing excess plant material and other impurities.

Clockwise from top: Shatter, distillate, crumble, badder, crystalline, rosin, dry sift.

Other common concentrates include: budder, sauce, sugar, cake, kief, hash, wax, and oil.

What are extracts?
All extracts are concentrates, but not all concentrates are extracts.
Extracts are a specific type of concentrate that use solvents to draw out the desired substances of a plant, seed or fruit.

Extracts are a specific type of concentrate that use solvents to draw out the desired substances of a plant.

Are there solvent free concentrates?
Rosin, dry sift and kief are examples of concentrates that are made without using solvents.

How can I use concentrates?
You can add any concentrate as a supplement to your next bowl, preroll or blunt.

Dabbing Equipment: To consume a cannabis concentrate safely and effectively, you must have a specific setup with the appropriate equipment in order to properly activate the concentrated cannabinoids and terpenes.

From left: Carb cap, quartz banger, titanium nail, dabber with carb cap, dab rig with quartz banger.

Cartridges

Cartridges allow for easy and discreet use as the cannabis vapor creates a less potent aroma.

The leading benefit for cannabis vaporization is that it’s a healthier alternative to smoking flower, as vapor doesn’t release the tar and carcinogens created during combustion (the process of burning flower).

The process of vaporization involves heating cannabis flower or concentrates to a temperature that turns the active compounds (cannabinoids and terpenes) into vapor. Vaporization is a healthier alternative to smoking as it occurs at temperatures that do not allow the flower to combust, which releases harmful tar and carcinogens.

The three main types are tabletop vaporizers, portable vaporizers and vape pens.

Edibles

Edibles are food items made with cannabis flower or concentrates. Thanks to advances in the cannabis culinary arts and the emergence of distillate, you can find a wide selection of high-quality baked goods, beverages, and treats that provide the desired effects of cannabis.

Cannabis-infused edibles are absorbed through the digestive system, which means the effects may take hours to set in and the potency of effects gradually increases. The effects may onset as quickly as 45 minutes or can take up to 3 hours to onset and the duration can last between 4 and 6 hours. It is possible to feel the effects as early as 20 minutes.

Find the Right Dose
Knowing the accurate dosage of an edible product and consuming at a measured pace is extremely important due to the delayed onset time and variable dosage options. The recommended dose for beginners is 1 to 5 mg of THC.

Edibles enter the body through the mouth and are absorbed through the gut. The absorbed compounds are metabolized in the liver. THC is metabolized in the liver into a compound called 11-hydroxy-THC. This compound is more potent than THC, has a longer half-life and can be very sedating. It’s this mechanism in the liver that causes edibles to have a different effect in most people. This entire process can take between 45 and 180 minutes.

Tinctures

By definition, a tincture is an herbal solution made with a specified oil as the primary extraction solvent. Tinctures are versatile and allow for accurate dosing and titration. Cannabis tinctures can be made from the raw cannabinoids THCA and CBDA or can be heated (a process known as decarboxylation) to convert the raw cannabinoids to THC and CBD. Most preparations are labeled with the main cannabinoids.

 

HOW DO TINCTURES WORK?

When applied sublingually, tinctures are absorbed through the body via blood vessels located under the tongue. This allows for relatively fast delivery directly into the bloodstream, where the cannabinoids can then be distributed to the cannabinoid receptors throughout the brain and body. Sublingual absorption provides onset as quickly as 15 minutes. Cannabinoids not absorbed under the tongue will travel with the carrier liquid through the digestive tract, where they’ll be absorbed like an edible — so, tinctures can present delayed onset of effects as well. When blended with food or drink, tinctures act in much the same way as edibles.

Topicals

A topical is a cannabis product, such as a lotion, balm, bath salts or a transdermal patch, meant to be applied directly to the affected area for symptom relief. Topicals provide localized effects to a specific area of the skin, joints, or muscles, and typically do not produce a psychoactive effect when used.

HOW TOPICALS WORK
Lotions, balms, and transdermal patches are applied to the surface of the skin, allowing cannabinoids to penetrate the dermal and subdermal layers. These layers of the skin provide pathways for relief that allow the cannabinoids to meet and bind with receptors located in the skin and throughout the body. These receptors regulate how one experiences sensations like pain and discomfort.

Topicals are used for relief from symptoms of injuries and inflammatory conditions that result in bone, muscle, ligament, and tendon pain. To provide relief from inflammation in a localized area, balm is applied directly to the surface of the skin on the affected area. Transdermal patches are another option for those in search of localized relief and have shown promise in providing systemic pain relief through prolonged administration.

EDUCATION

Click on a topic below for more info.

Flower

What is the difference between cannabis types?
When you shop, you may notice strains are commonly broken up into three distinct groups: indica, sativa, and hybrid.

Most consumers have used these three cannabis types as a touchstone for predicting effects:

  • Indica strains are believed to be physically sedating, perfect for relaxing with a movie or as a nightcap before bed.
  • Sativa stains tend to provide more invigorating, uplifting cerebral effects that pair well with physical activity, social gatherings, and creative projects.
  • Hybrids are thought to fall somewhere in between the indica-sativa spectrum, depending on the traits they inherit from their parent strains.

Concentrates

Concentrates are safe, yet potent. Concentrates are products made from the cannabis plant that have been processed to keep only the most desirable plant compounds (primarily the cannabinoids and terpenes), while removing excess plant material and other impurities.

Clockwise from top: Shatter, distillate, crumble, badder, crystalline, rosin, dry sift.

Other common concentrates include: budder, sauce, sugar, cake, kief, hash, wax, and oil.

What are extracts?
All extracts are concentrates, but not all concentrates are extracts.
Extracts are a specific type of concentrate that use solvents to draw out the desired substances of a plant, seed or fruit.

Extracts are a specific type of concentrate that use solvents to draw out the desired substances of a plant.

Are there solvent free concentrates?
Rosin, dry sift and kief are examples of concentrates that are made without using solvents.

How can I use concentrates?
You can add any concentrate as a supplement to your next bowl, preroll or blunt.

Dabbing Equipment: To consume a cannabis concentrate safely and effectively, you must have a specific setup with the appropriate equipment in order to properly activate the concentrated cannabinoids and terpenes.

From left: Carb cap, quartz banger, titanium nail, dabber with carb cap, dab rig with quartz banger.

Cartridges

Cartridges allow for easy and discreet use as the cannabis vapor creates a less potent aroma.

The leading benefit for cannabis vaporization is that it’s a healthier alternative to smoking flower, as vapor doesn’t release the tar and carcinogens created during combustion (the process of burning flower).

The process of vaporization involves heating cannabis flower or concentrates to a temperature that turns the active compounds (cannabinoids and terpenes) into vapor. Vaporization is a healthier alternative to smoking as it occurs at temperatures that do not allow the flower to combust, which releases harmful tar and carcinogens.

The three main types are tabletop vaporizers, portable vaporizers and vape pens.

Edibles

Edibles are food items made with cannabis flower or concentrates. Thanks to advances in the cannabis culinary arts and the emergence of distillate, you can find a wide selection of high-quality baked goods, beverages, and treats that provide the desired effects of cannabis.

Cannabis-infused edibles are absorbed through the digestive system, which means the effects may take hours to set in and the potency of effects gradually increases. The effects may onset as quickly as 45 minutes or can take up to 3 hours to onset and the duration can last between 4 and 6 hours. It is possible to feel the effects as early as 20 minutes.

Find the Right Dose
Knowing the accurate dosage of an edible product and consuming at a measured pace is extremely important due to the delayed onset time and variable dosage options. The recommended dose for beginners is 1 to 5 mg of THC.

Edibles enter the body through the mouth and are absorbed through the gut. The absorbed compounds are metabolized in the liver. THC is metabolized in the liver into a compound called 11-hydroxy-THC. This compound is more potent than THC, has a longer half-life and can be very sedating. It’s this mechanism in the liver that causes edibles to have a different effect in most people. This entire process can take between 45 and 180 minutes.

Tinctures

By definition, a tincture is an herbal solution made with a specified oil as the primary extraction solvent. Tinctures are versatile and allow for accurate dosing and titration. Cannabis tinctures can be made from the raw cannabinoids THCA and CBDA or can be heated (a process known as decarboxylation) to convert the raw cannabinoids to THC and CBD. Most preparations are labeled with the main cannabinoids.

 

HOW DO TINCTURES WORK?

When applied sublingually, tinctures are absorbed through the body via blood vessels located under the tongue. This allows for relatively fast delivery directly into the bloodstream, where the cannabinoids can then be distributed to the cannabinoid receptors throughout the brain and body. Sublingual absorption provides onset as quickly as 15 minutes. Cannabinoids not absorbed under the tongue will travel with the carrier liquid through the digestive tract, where they’ll be absorbed like an edible — so, tinctures can present delayed onset of effects as well. When blended with food or drink, tinctures act in much the same way as edibles.

Topicals

A topical is a cannabis product, such as a lotion, balm, bath salts or a transdermal patch, meant to be applied directly to the affected area for symptom relief. Topicals provide localized effects to a specific area of the skin, joints, or muscles, and typically do not produce a psychoactive effect when used.

HOW TOPICALS WORK
Lotions, balms, and transdermal patches are applied to the surface of the skin, allowing cannabinoids to penetrate the dermal and subdermal layers. These layers of the skin provide pathways for relief that allow the cannabinoids to meet and bind with receptors located in the skin and throughout the body. These receptors regulate how one experiences sensations like pain and discomfort.

Topicals are used for relief from symptoms of injuries and inflammatory conditions that result in bone, muscle, ligament, and tendon pain. To provide relief from inflammation in a localized area, balm is applied directly to the surface of the skin on the affected area. Transdermal patches are another option for those in search of localized relief and have shown promise in providing systemic pain relief through prolonged administration.